Psychedelic Science

Johnny Vodka

Well-Known Member
Organising a Psychedelic Society of Glasgow pub meet-up in Glasgow on March 16th should anyone fancy coming along...
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
this might be of interest to your society JV - from what I can make out these are simulated, virtual psychedelic trips

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/mar/26/acid-test-how-psychedelic-virtual-reality-can-end-societys-mass-bad-trip

wondering though why they would want to recreate a near-death experience ? and how they can ethically justify introducing it to people in palliative care !!!! all humans naturally fear death to varying degrees - is there not a danger here that you could unleash unpredictable terror on people not equipped to handle it, and could actually hasten their check-out times?
 

Johnny Vodka

Well-Known Member
this might be of interest to your society JV - from what I can make out these are simulated, virtual psychedelic trips

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/mar/26/acid-test-how-psychedelic-virtual-reality-can-end-societys-mass-bad-trip

wondering though why they would want to recreate a near-death experience ? and how they can ethically justify introducing it to people in palliative care !!!! all humans naturally fear death to varying degrees - is there not a danger here that you could unleash unpredictable terror on people not equipped to handle it, and could actually hasten their check-out times?
There have been trials giving people who are close to death psilocybin (magic mushroom chemical) and AFAIK it really helps them in coming to terms with the inevitable. The idea is that in experiencing ego death, real death becomes far less scary. You realise how connected everything is. However, after a quick scan of that article, I can't see how a purely visual experience can replicate ego death. Psilocybin works by dampening down activity in the default mode network part of the brain (IIRC), the bit that makes you YOU. When activity there is dampened down enough, you merge with the universe. (I've never got anywhere near this stage.)
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
not sure how I feel about testing on mentally impaired people in their 80s/90s - do you at that stage not 'naturally' reach a level of acceptance, if nothing else through increasing fatigue? I am interested though in where the psychs help people with depression or inhibition. I would be willing to try out certain things but not in the expectation my life would change overnight. I lean towards the cautious side due to some horrendous experience on K which put me off repeating. I was watching this thing about Peter Green (ex-Fleetwood Mac) who was given some old school LSD by some German hippies in a forest and 'never came back'. Interested in why his brain was altered permanently - conspiracy theorists have suggested that some cults are only too aware of this when they recruit people but that implies something a lot more sinister - whereas perhaps the more boring truth is that different brains are simply hardwired to react differently?
 

Johnny Vodka

Well-Known Member
not sure how I feel about testing on mentally impaired people in their 80s/90s - do you at that stage not 'naturally' reach a level of acceptance, if nothing else through increasing fatigue? I am interested though in where the psychs help people with depression or inhibition. I would be willing to try out certain things but not in the expectation my life would change overnight. I lean towards the cautious side due to some horrendous experience on K which put me off repeating. I was watching this thing about Peter Green (ex-Fleetwood Mac) who was given some old school LSD by some German hippies in a forest and 'never came back'. Interested in why his brain was altered permanently - conspiracy theorists have suggested that some cults are only too aware of this when they recruit people but that implies something a lot more sinister - whereas perhaps the more boring truth is that different brains are simply hardwired to react differently?
The psilocybin trials I've read about have been with cancer patients and I would imagine they'd need to be mentally sound. There is loads to read and watch on the subject. 🙂 Participants are given the chemical in a controlled setting and probably only once. There will be an integration session to help them make sense of their trip. How much your life changes will depend on the person and strength of experience. Greater changes are linked to stronger ("mystical") experiences and ego death.

Also, participants will be screened for conditions like bipolar and schizophrenia beforehand. Peter Green maybe had some underlying or dormant condition along those lines?
 

badway99

New Member
Interesting thread! Speaking about magic mushroom isn't something that happens often.

The link between depression and psylocibe has nothing to do with chemicals in the brain. This is the fact that you understand that there is no brain and then no chemicals nor depression. The only existent thing in universe is your feeling, now and here, and nothing else. Time and space do not exist. Your life, the people that you know, politics, religion, money, education, jobs, etc is here only because you want it to create a wave in your "feeling". You want it because you (we or I, as we are one) live in a dream, or a game, that we believe in order to feel. We forget because we want to forget,as the pill is too hard to swallow for many.

Ying yang is the only significant symbol, that explains this but it is mostly misunderstood.

Nothing is hidden to those who want to know the truth! There are hints everywhere, you just have to open your eyes, as it is universal law you cannot be prisoner of your own dream. Sugestion is the key, tv, internet education,religion,politics are here to tell you hints of the truth without you knowing it. You may understand a message that is totally different of the REAL message.

Anyway, exlaining consciousness with word is similar to explain a colour to a blind person. Mushroom are here to help those who want to know, but this is not enough,the hard job has to be done within yourself before the experience. It may take months for some and years for some other.

But the majority (99% of the people) is absolutely hopeless, zombies-drones running after stupid money, without any consciousness left inside, and just secondary characters of the game!
 

Johnny Vodka

Well-Known Member
In case this interests anyone (volunteer opportunities) -


PsyCare UK provides a peaceful, friendly sanctuary in the midst of the sometimes hectic festival environment. We are always open to provide information and support to anyone that needs it. From crisis intervention for people who may be in profoundly disturbed mental states, to support for the lonely with a hot cuppa and a chat, PsyCare UK aims to consistently support the wellbeing of all festival goers.
Although most drug use at festivals is intended for enjoyment, some drug experiences can cause a person to be physically and mentally vulnerable; to experience feelings of fear, paranoia, delusion, discomfort and even psychosis; creating the potential for people to be a danger to themselves and others.
Difficult experiences arising from psychedelic drug use may require specialist intervention due to the mental crises and altered states of consciousness they can induce. People on a strong psychedelic “trip” can become volatile and feel a wide range of intense and heightened emotions, potentially lasting several hours. In these cases, conventional medical services may struggle to find an appropriate treatment and once in the care of medics and/or taken off the festival site, patrons might not be allowed to return to the event. If the police or security are involved, the situation may escalate and the individual may be arrested or sectioned. Being taken to hospital or handled by security or police whilst undergoing an intense and frightening psychedelic experience can be incredibly traumatic and increase the risk of long-term emotional and psychological harm. We work closely with medical personnel to address the needs of those in distress, while aiming to prevent sedation, hospitalisation or detention. Our work over the years has demonstrated that these individuals often only require the type of engaged, empathic care we provide, to move from a place of crisis to a calm, positive perspective.
We believe that the principle of ‘set and setting’ is key for psychedelic support. This approach recognises the impact that the user’s mindset and their physical and social environment has on their drug experience. We provide a multidisciplinary approach, meaning that each volunteer will offer what they feel is appropriate for the individual they are supporting. This could be anything from massage or holding someone’s hand, to simply providing a listening ear and a calm presence. PsyCare UK works on the principles of peer education; being comprised largely of individuals who themselves enjoy festivals, we aim to be approachable and familiar, and to project a sense of calm, compassion and competence. We are akin to sitters rather than guides, but our understanding of the experiences our service users may undergo often makes all the difference to the outcome. All our volunteers undergo basic training in ethical and caring work standards and follow the principles and guidelines set out in The Manual of Psychedelic Support.
 
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