*** ibiza 2018 observations ***

el_loco

Well-Known Member
worst service I experienced this year was at pacha restaurant. you'd think that at these prices it should be better but this guy was arrogant, impolite and didn't smile once. you could really see that he'd rather be a model or an instagram star and let everybody feel how he hated his job serving other people :/
btw pacha prints a "suggested tip" on their restaurant bills. it said "37 euros" hahahaha
 

Bones

Active Member
What's been the quietest disappointing nights this year? any stand outs?

also, how weak is that amnesia closing line up?!
 

Neo95gt

Well-Known Member
Afterlife had a strong season in terms of numbers and music. The production was excellent and it really helped the social media perception. I had a great time at the party, but the crowd is definitely off.
 

stivi

Super Moderator
Staff member
Afterlife had a strong season in terms of numbers and music. The production was excellent and it really helped the social media perception. I had a great time at the party, but the crowd is definitely off.
and that‘s exactly the dilemma. a success business wise, but crowd has changed undeniably and there are lots of ppl who used to be afterlife regulars and simply didn‘t enjoy it as much this year because of this. afterlife wasn‘t one of those parties where you used to see hundreds of bloody mobile phones all the time.

the variety of opinions on here shows exactly that - some people appreciate the music and production and for others, the crowd mix is also very important and it‘s a simple fact this has changed a lot this summer.
 

Neo95gt

Well-Known Member
and that‘s exactly the dilemma. a success business wise, but crowd has changed undeniably and there are lots of ppl who used to be afterlife regulars and simply didn‘t enjoy it as much this year because of this. afterlife wasn‘t one of those parties where you used to see hundreds of bloody mobile phones all the time.

the variety of opinions on here shows exactly that - some people appreciate the music and production and for others, the crowd mix is also very important and it‘s a simple fact this has changed a lot this summer.
Does Carm, Matteo and their management know this? Or are they blind to this because of all the positive feedback they see on social media?

I noticed Adriatique did not mention Hi in your interview with them.
 

stivi

Super Moderator
Staff member
Does Carm, Matteo and their management know this? Or are they blind to this because of all the positive feedback they see on social media?

I noticed Adriatique did not mention Hi in your interview with them.
I‘m sure they heard the not-so-convinced voices as well...
 

Big Wox

Active Member
Much to my chagrin the phone culture is here to stay. Not sure there is much we can do about it. I try not to let it bother me on a night out but I normally end up passing a comment about it and then once I’m locked into it (folk waving phones about) it’s hard to not notice it all the time. I just try and lock into the music as that’s what it’s about for me personally.
 

Clara

Well-Known Member
Much to my chagrin the phone culture is here to stay. Not sure there is much we can do about it.
Put a sticker over people's phones as they do in Berghain and De School? Appreciate they can't take phones off people at the entrance, as they used to do with cameras in Ibiza back in the day, but the stickers and posters around saying 'no filming / photography' would be a start.

So many DJs highlight it as a pet hate of theirs in interviews and you can see it puts them on edge having a sea of phones thrust in their face.
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
I agree - admittedly I did take three very short films at the Acid Mothers Temple gig I went to on Friday night, but I justified that because I did it discreetly on the far side of the room and this was a very unique, visual band of artists I may never get to see again - a world away from very dull-looking DJs you're not supposed to watch let alone film...

personally I think the mentality that drives people to see DJs as superstars is what really needs to change. If more people saw them for what they basically are - technicians with specific music tastes celebrating other people's creativity - then it wouldn't even occur to people to take pictures
 

MrHullMysterious

Active Member
The problem is more to do with people doing it on the dance floor. If off to the sides (and no flash/light on) then it's less of a bother. So perhaps have "You can use your camera/selfie to hearts content" zones in clubs? (Pacha and Space both have/had a photo wall near the entrances)

Or the club's film the event and make it available on social media so the kiddiewinks can re-share and tag themselves in. After all that seems the main draw, look where I am and how sick it is etc.:rolleyes:
 

Chris L

Active Member
personally I think the mentality that drives people to see DJs as superstars is what really needs to change. If more people saw them for what they basically are - technicians with specific music tastes celebrating other people's creativity - then it wouldn't even occur to people to take pictures
I understand you're point but i think you're a little off the mark here. I think @MrHullMysterious is more in the right direction towards the end of the last post. I'm not so sure it's that the younger generation sees every DJ as a superstar but taking the photos and videos their way of showing off where they are. They want to be seen as 'cool' for being at Afterlife or Elrow or whatever it may be and post it everywhere on social media and people then see it and think fondly of them. Yes, some djs are certainly seen as superstars Carl Cox jumps to mind but i dont think that matters as much as the you're seen as 'cool' if you go to certain events/places (different story but this same factor has totally destroyed Output in Brooklyn). I for one, usually prefer for people not to know where I am, so taking photos and videos never much came across as something i needed to do and posting them would certainly be counter intuitive to that notion.
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
ok I get your point. I think it is a bit of both. maybe the people who go to the party to be at the party are now more prolific than the people who go for the DJ (or right at the bottom of the heap the stone-age suckers like me who still go out for the music...) The party PRs are the biggest offenders in a way. create the brand, the brand, the brand.... and everything else slots into place. all alien to me of course. half the places I know in London don't even have a name on the door, let alone a brand...
 

Neo95gt

Well-Known Member
off topic but...


still, some of them got very offended when xescu prats said they are not musicians... what's next, the guy who makes photocopies will get offended when someone tells him he's not a writer?!
If you guys think DJs simply mix other people’s music, you’re pretty far off the mark here. It ain’t 1995 anymore. They are treated like rockstars because they are today’s rockstars.
 
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