Odyssey 24 Hour Opening @ USHUAÏA & HÏ

Wayno

Active Member
I do remember when you got a free drink on entry, one passout (Home on Sunday) and they paid your taxi if you had enough people in it....although the drinks were about the same.
That's right, it was half the taxi fare if three people and the full fare refunded if there was four
 

mr_why

Well-Known Member
Space closing fiesta gave you two free drinks ... That said, it was €100 entry.
As I have said previously this week, we all seem to have forgotten that Space (and other promoters that are now 'men of the people') used to actually charge us money to enter, and consume drinks!
 

Nobbie Q

Active Member
I don't want to get into it too much, but I basically liken festivals to Netflix in such that Netflix cheapens visual media by making it so readily accessible to everyone. There's less appreciation for the show or movie, making it less special, and for movies especially where you don't have that unique feel of going out and watching it theatres.

Just substitute DJ sets for shows/movies for festivals and it works the same way, where with a wide variety of sets available, each set feels less "special" and each DJ just feels like another spoke in the wheel. The appreciation for the DJ craft is lost as a result. Also gone is that specialness of going out to a night and seeing a DJ individually, and really savouring what they're doing. I'm sure many ppl don't like this aspect of going out and waiting in queues, but it's what kinda makes the night special, the anticipation.

I do like stacked lineups for sure but some festivals really overdue it and shorten set times. Ibiza has the right amount of stacked lineups in most of their events and I enjoy that.

Or maybe I'm just an old dinosaur that relishes Ibiza's past and the dominance it once had. Even though I didn't start going till 2015, I still remember reading up on Ibiza's scene when I discovered the music in the early 2000s and I guess maybe I still cling to that.

I'm sure ppl will disagree with this, but this is my $.02.
Going off topic here, but DVS1 basically echoing my thoughts about festivals vs. clubs in this insightful interview:

 

white_isle_calling

Well-Known Member
I agree about festival vs clubs. Not sure on the Netflix comparison though tbf. I think there's lots of evidence to suggest TV series are more compelling, better written and better acted than most Hollywood films in the modern age.
 

Nobbie Q

Active Member
Just like how Netflix provides hours of visual content at your convenience, a festival provides hours of DJ sets conveniently as well. Both cater to short attention spans, Netflix specifically with its endless supply of cheaply made TV shows with episodes at 30 mins - 1 hour
 

makka

Well-Known Member
Ha! Ouch. Expensive rave.

I nearly missed out on my 2nd as I was sat down chatting rubbish and the lights came on (I was shocked it finish as early as midday) ... Thankfully the barman sorted me after my quick sprint to the bar!
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
Just like how Netflix provides hours of visual content at your convenience, a festival provides hours of DJ sets conveniently as well. Both cater to short attention spans, Netflix specifically with its endless supply of cheaply made TV shows with episodes at 30 mins - 1 hour
interesting analogy. when did attention spans get so short? i wonder if it's because app-addicted kids aren't emotionally invested in anything anymore except the approval of others..? whereas previous generations got out there and created communities and actually celebrated being marginal and niche. I think it is also reflects the fact that people now are getting into festivals and bypassing the clubs altogether, it's like DVS1 said they haven't grown up with that education or patience and don't know any different. it's obv not their fault but it is a disturbing trend and poses a mortal threat to the survival of club culture as anything meaningful. clubbing was never supposed to be a fad, for many of us it was akin to a religious, communal experience, a parallel universe - but I suppose it couldn't last forever once the secret was out....
 

LuckyBlueSuit

Active Member
interesting analogy. when did attention spans get so short? i wonder if it's because app-addicted kids aren't emotionally invested in anything anymore except the approval of others..? whereas previous generations got out there and created communities and actually celebrated being marginal and niche. I think it is also reflects the fact that people now are getting into festivals and bypassing the clubs altogether, it's like DVS1 said they haven't grown up with that education or patience and don't know any different. it's obv not their fault but it is a disturbing trend and poses a mortal threat to the survival of club culture as anything meaningful. clubbing was never supposed to be a fad, for many of us it was akin to a religious, communal experience, a parallel universe - but I suppose it couldn't last forever once the secret was out....
I think you (and I, to an extent) are in the minority though. Clubbing and dance music through the generations has always had a shelf life for most people. It’s something they do in their late teens and twenties before they lose interest, energy and other things in life take over. It was the same for those that got into northern soul, glenn miller, etc in previous generations. At some point, most people stop evolving in terms of musical taste and stay stuck in the period that they enjoyed most. As a result, taste of future generations evolves into different things.

Re attention span - I like DVS1 a lot. But it was his own attention span and desire to try new that got him jail time as a young man. Young people are generally able to maintain attention if they are interested in the product. Try getting kids of fortnite, social media, the football pitch.....it’s the quality of product that is the issue.
 
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Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
I think what has changed is that in the past there was more live and let live, you would have the cheesy club on the high street and something more edgy on the backstreets and people could go wherever they wanted - a happy state of affairs for everyone. northern soul, punk, jazz-funk, rare groove, acid house, indie all came out of local pubs/clubs and then eventually it all fed through to the charts. but now festivals are killing the clubs so where are the innovators and risk-takers supposed to cut their teeth?
 

LuckyBlueSuit

Active Member
I think what has changed is that in the past there was more live and let live, you would have the cheesy club on the high street and something more edgy on the backstreets and people could go wherever they wanted - a happy state of affairs for everyone. northern soul, punk, jazz-funk, rare groove, acid house, indie all came out of local pubs/clubs and then eventually it all fed through to the charts. but now festivals are killing the clubs so where are the innovators and risk-takers supposed to cut their teeth?
Can’t disagree with that. However, Festivals, smoking bans, this generation not being into alcohol or recreational drugs to the same extent as the last, social media, gaming and dance music not being as fashionable as it used to be - all reason why clubs are dying. This is the sensible generation, apparently.

There are still clubs and bars where future promoters can take risks. But it will be underground and won’t attract lots of interest because the market isn’t there. To an extent this isn’t a bad thing, arguably it’s a throw back to the post illegal rave 90s.

There is also a lack of exclusivity, when I was growing up It was practically impossible to find the new tunes that a good dj played, you had to wait six months and root through record stores, listen to the essential mix, wait for compilations or an illegal tape or cd or hope it was mentioned in the dj or Muzik mag dj chart sections. These days it’s all about now. I do think that most dance music has always been highly disposable though, except for the very best records.
 
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