Who'd be a promoter?

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
I think it's quite interesting how many parallels there are with the millennium when the UK scene got too fat and crashed - I think even now, a lot of lessons have not yet been learned especially the quick-buck greed and total contempt for the grassroots. where's it different though is in how slick everything has got. (not to mention the social media dimension which wasn't there in the Oakey era) People love to attack EDM but all that silliness was all masterminded by big corporates who have moved on to supposedly cooler dance events - and the alarm bells are ringing imo because even 5-10 years ago EDM was a joke and never a serious threat to dance culture whereas the new festivals are. Someone on the goss thread mentioned short set-times - well that's what happens when you try and cram as many DJs as you can in to appeal to the widest fanbase (usually all the same names from that tiny elite the article references). DJs invariably head straight for the bangers and cut out the suspense to the kickdrum because they are conscious of the clock so quality suffers and sets become more predictable. So the moral is support small, support independent and support local wherever and whenever you can!
 

Ikoda

Well-Known Member
Ah, I read this when it came out.

Agree with a lot of it. Certainly in Trance, it's only got worse I think.
 

AR_IBIZA

Active Member
So the moral is support small, support independent and support local wherever and whenever you can!
I agree that this needs to happen but sometimes it is not always practical. If I was able to go out every weekend I would be attending many smaller events to support friends and new upcoming DJs all the time.

The problem is if I can only go out once every couple months I will choose to go and see my favourite DJs as I am comfortable knowing the night will be a success (80% of the time). For example in London I have tried to support friends events which have turned into complete flops. No one there, poor management at the venues and ultimately resulted in a shit night out. That night would cost me the same as going to see my fav DJ at say Fabric. At Fabric I know exactly what I am getting, top quality sound, top quality djs and imo a very good crowd for the events I choose to go.

I really dislike the festival set up and as a result do not attend many, only one in the UK I bother going to is J2 which is programmed really really well. If a festival like J2 wasn't on offer I may well be inclined to try out some smaller ones but they are a big gamble and with the cost involved not one I am always willing to take.

The problem is those festivals you refer to aren't really attended by proper music fans and if them festivals didn't exist I don't think the people would be attending small local ones, they would just be doing something else which is seen as cool by the masses. At the end of the day if you really like music you will go where you want to go and not where the crowds go.
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
I heard instagram are looking at removing 'like' totals, which if implemented could have far-reaching consequences for those DJs who have suddenly (and mysteriously..) rocketed to fame
 

S.j.R.

Member
Its about time, Ive had enough of people becoming famous for nothing, Dj or dumbass posing in lingerie in their washroom thinking they are models.

That being said I gave up all social media when I quit being active in the local scene, much happier place without it.
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
yes I've recently had a rethink on how to use social media - it feels more intense when like me you work at home and loads of people you know are thousands of miles away. The scene i'm into's pretty small where I live so a cursory FB search usually tells me all I need to know. I never lick anyone's arse to get guesties or free promos or anything. I see other people do it all the time but just makes me cringe. When a producer I know/like releases a stinker of a track/mix, that can be awkward so I tend to conveniently 'disappear'. If you forever big up your pals then people will smell a rat. i struggle with the self-promotion for the things I do, but others are masters at it. SM has its uses, but I think a part of everyone misses paper flyers, record-digging and the thrill of hearing something word of mouth but those days are nearly gone..
 

craig72

Well-Known Member
Cochella used to be pretty cool when it started yeah?.. I remember lads from here going years ago just for the bands that were playing and raving about it.. before social media obviously
 
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Crawleytown

Active Member
Really interesting article. Must say I have well and truly fallen into the trap they describe of booking large-scale events far in advance, getting Airbnb’s sorted and booking the Monday off work... breaks the year up and gives you something to look forward to all the time.
 
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