Few questions about permanently relocating

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
this is why you can't let the free market run rampant over a small island. It has to be controlled. Key workers should be heavily subsidised.

one of the great ironies is that the poorer, simpler way of life enjoyed until the 80s is probably the most sustainable (and therefore desirable) now, but I have a feeling the likes of Greta T wouldn't be too popular in certain corners of that island - money still talks...
 

stephen

Super Moderator
Staff member
some points
48% of balearic workers earn less than €1000 per month
public sector workers' salaries are weighted to reflect higher costs of living on islands
political decision makers enforce the necessity of speaking catalan for certain jobs
most professionals view ibiza as a cultural backwater with little attraction to draw them here.
 

feynman

Active Member
some points
48% of balearic workers earn less than €1000 per month
public sector workers' salaries are weighted to reflect higher costs of living on islands
political decision makers enforce the necessity of speaking catalan for certain jobs
most professionals view ibiza as a cultural backwater with little attraction to draw them here.
Thats the point. Ask some people who are living there permanently : After some time you know everything and everyone. For some people it will be boring.
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
the language issue is a real hot potato here too. essential for public sector at regional level. but if people haven't grown up speaking it, they feel discriminated against. Yet I can understand why the laws exist. it's cultural protectionism to prevent the language disappearing into oblivion like Breton or Gaelic.
 

feynman

Active Member
some points
48% of balearic workers earn less than €1000 per month
public sector workers' salaries are weighted to reflect higher costs of living on islands
political decision makers enforce the necessity of speaking catalan for certain jobs
most professionals view ibiza as a cultural backwater with little attraction to draw them here.
1000 E after Tax , I hope ...

Impossible to live with .

Sorry for this : In earlier days , some families were happy if the daughter finds a good ( catholic ) german or english husband. Not often , but really sometimes.
Some families want their children away from Ibz because less good jobs . Not everyone can or wants to work in tourism or tourism dependent areas.
Ibizabcan be a paradies , but it has dark edges ...
 

craig72

Well-Known Member
My aunt was looking at a place and said for the time she would be here it's not worth it.. she has a place in Goa and Tenerife and imports all the crap you see at hippy markets... Place in Goa cost £1500 over 30 yrs ago
 

CasaNegron

Active Member
yes true that ibiza was once poor, that is oftern well documented in all them documentries and films about ibizas past. while some landowners cashed in, others like the middle and working class who didnt own land/property never where able to profit from it. wonder how much a spanish cop gets paid?
Honestly this is one of my concerns about moving to IBZ permanently. I may scheme my way into owning property coming in with income from the outside, but if my children grow up there they may be forever priced out and will not be able to settle comfortably. Of course a lot of assumptions about the future (an my kids), but living in a pricey tourist destination now, I can see how that might impact young local people.

This is one of the reasons I will need to eventually take a trip to Mallorca to check it out. Home-ownership seems much more accessible on a working class salary. No on the ground experience obviously, just doing the math from listings.
 

CasaNegron

Active Member
Thats the point. Ask some people who are living there permanently : After some time you know everything and everyone. For some people it will be boring.
I currently live on an island the size of Formentera (w/ 5x as many people). You do feel a bit limited, but honestly, having kids you dont go out much anyway. The small-town vibe is actually a plus, sometimes.

If I was younger or single, no way!
 

Pittley

Active Member
Honestly this is one of my concerns about moving to IBZ permanently. I may scheme my way into owning property coming in with income from the outside, but if my children grow up there they may be forever priced out and will not be able to settle comfortably. Of course a lot of assumptions about the future (an my kids), but living in a pricey tourist destination now, I can see how that might impact young local people.

This is one of the reasons I will need to eventually take a trip to Mallorca to check it out. Home-ownership seems much more accessible on a working class salary. No on the ground experience obviously, just doing the math from listings.
the cases are different, personaly i would not move to ibz if i had younger kids, the education in our home country switzerland/uk just seem better and not forgetting the language barrier even there are billingual/english schools on ibiza and they might be good so the kids can later go to uni or find proper paid jobs. our daughter just finished university so we are finaly out now paying for her expensive student lifestyle, now we can start saving and we consider of an early withraw of our pension money to buy property. propperty prices in mallorca are a bit lower then ibz but its just not the same lifestyle there like in ibiza.
 

Namaste

Active Member
Obviously I would need to open a bank account and have some cash in it, but will I need a proof of address for this? Or can it be the address we have on our NIE?
I opened my account with my home address, which is different to the one I applied for my NIE with.
It is probably only recommendable to name an address where they can reach you via mail in case they want/have to.
 

craig72

Well-Known Member
I've really seen People struggling this Year more so than last few years.. with business and even 3 generations of addiction and dealing in one family.. slippery slope that some fall into..☹
 
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greg1183

Active Member
some points
48% of balearic workers earn less than €1000 per month
public sector workers' salaries are weighted to reflect higher costs of living on islands
political decision makers enforce the necessity of speaking catalan for certain jobs
most professionals view ibiza as a cultural backwater with little attraction to draw them here.
Don’t really understand while people need to speak Catalan for certain jobs as the Balearic are not in Catalan territory?
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
Don’t really understand while people need to speak Catalan for certain jobs as the Balearic are not in Catalan territory?
they broadly speak the same language although a lot of people in the balearics get a bit pissed off when Catalonian Catalans refer to the "Països Catalans " (catalan countries) - Disentangling all the history and regional differences will give everyone a headache so I'm not even going there! :lol: But the balearic and catalan governments do generally share in common a commitment to protecting their language
 

CasaNegron

Active Member
the cases are different, personaly i would not move to ibz if i had younger kids, the education in our home country switzerland/uk just seem better and not forgetting the language barrier even there are billingual/english schools on ibiza and they might be good so the kids can later go to uni or find proper paid jobs. our daughter just finished university so we are finaly out now paying for her expensive student lifestyle, now we can start saving and we consider of an early withraw of our pension money to buy property. propperty prices in mallorca are a bit lower then ibz but its just not the same lifestyle there like in ibiza.
We are an American/ Argentine couple, so the kids are already bi-lingual. I assume Catalan would be a bit easier for them. If they choose to go to university I suspect they would have the ability to choose between a few countries. I agree, that if your children are already out the door, that simplifies things a bit.

My concern was more for youngsters that stay (possibly my own) that would never be able to build any wealth if they chose to remain due to the combination of low wages and high rents/ prices. Many people, but not all, tend to stay where they grew up or return after some time for education/ early work experience.
 

stephen

Super Moderator
Staff member
Don’t really understand while people need to speak Catalan for certain jobs as the Balearic are not in Catalan territory?
did you never wonder why road signs have eivissa, sant antoni rather than ibiza and san antonio? you are correct in questioning the logic behind the necessity of catalan in many jobs when all catalan speakers are bilingual. why would you restrict your search for a chief neuro-surgeon at the hospital to a labour market of 10% of the population because of this? in san jose, the first questio on the application to be a taxi driver is not, can you drive, or have you got a license, not even do you have any idea of the geography of ibiza, but can you speak catalan! ironic when 90% of summer clients in taxis don't even know what catalan is.
 

Vinyldreams

Active Member
my gf is in similar position - NIE conditional on having a job (or sponsorship), bank setup and health insurance (the next step)

also once you're settled in, don't forget to get your empadronamiento - which gives you official status at local town hall level (I think that is also necessary for NIE)

https://expatsmagazine.org/empadronamiento-in-spain/
Nie and empard won’t mean much you will need full residency, but can’t see brexit happening so don’t worry to much
 

Kim Wrong Un

Active Member
Nie and empard won’t mean much you will need full residency, but can’t see brexit happening so don’t worry to much
hi, have you got a UK or Spanish driving licence? - am trying to transfer but a bit of a ballache. Is there a loophole where you can apply for 2 different driving licences if you apply to the British and Spanish separately? That would be my preferred.

the DGT sent me this, which I think means you don't have to attend a cita previa

https://sede-org.dgt.gob.es/sede-electronica/es/permisos-de-conducir/canje-permisos/canje-permisos-extranjeros/canje-renovacion-sustitucion-uk/sustitucion-permisos-uk/index.shtml
 

TimmiT

Active Member
hi, have you got a UK or Spanish driving licence? - am trying to transfer but a bit of a ballache. Is there a loophole where you can apply for 2 different driving licences if you apply to the British and Spanish separately? That would be my preferred.

the DGT sent me this, which I think means you don't have to attend a cita previa

https://sede-org.dgt.gob.es/sede-electronica/es/permisos-de-conducir/canje-permisos/canje-permisos-extranjeros/canje-renovacion-sustitucion-uk/sustitucion-permisos-uk/index.shtml
In theory you cannot hold two driving licences and you have to hand one over to get the other, in practice you can declare one lost and apply for a replacement then hand the "lost" one in when you need to exchange it for the foreign one. I believe it's actually illegal though, so of course I would never, ever do such a thing.
 
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